175-foot-tall design of 175 Park Avenue gets approval in Midtown East, Manhattan

At number one on our year-end countdown is Skidmore Owings & Merrill’s mixed-use supertall at 175 Park Avenue in Midtown East, which received New City Council approval earlier this month. York. Developed by RXR Realty and TF Cornerstone, the 85-story tower has been reduced from 1,642 to 1,575 feet, still enough to overtake Central Park Tower for the title of New York’s tallest building in terms of roof height. 175 Park Avenue will eventually rise from the site of the Grand Hyatt hotel between the 108-year-old Grand Central Terminal of Fine Arts and the 91-year-old Chrysler Building Art Deco. The structure will produce 2.1 million square feet of Class A office space; 500 Hyatt hotel rooms on upper floors covering 453,000 square feet; 10,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor, cellar and second levels; and a 25,000 square foot raised public plaza, populated with artwork and views overlooking the surrounding streets of Midtown.

175 Park Avenue, aka Project Commodore. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

175 Park Avenue, aka Project Commodore, among the future skyline of Midtown East. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

175 Park Avenue and surrounding buildings along 42nd Street. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

175 Park Avenue South Base along 42nd Street. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

175 Park Avenue South Base along 42nd Street. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Steps leading to the terraces of 42nd Street. Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Rendered by Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Demolition work has yet to begin on the Hyatt Grand Central New York. Its all-dark glass facade and monolithic mass will eventually make way for this new 21st century icon for the city, which will eclipse the pinnacle of Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Vanderbilt across the Grand Central Terminal, and the Chrysler Building. beloved across Lexington Street.

Photo by Michael Young

Photo by Michael Young

Photo by Michael Young

Photo by Michael Young

Photo by Michael Young

The One Vanderbilt nearby. Photo by Michael Young

The plans were initially approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, and the project quickly entered the Uniform Land Use Review (ULURP) process last May. Construction of 175 Park Avenue will come alongside a partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) to generate hundreds of millions of dollars in new infrastructure and transportation upgrades to the adjacent Grand Central Terminal. These include a new 5,328 square foot transit hall, improvements along Lexington Avenue and a new subway entrance at East 42nd Street. An additional $ 38 million will be used for the East Midtown Public Realm Improvement Fund for public spaces improvement. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill intends to integrate the office aspect into an artistic and cultural programming spread over 12 large-scale events per year with a partner organization, as well as 25 additional events. All of this will be coordinated by a cultural advisory committee.

Rendered by Ekoomedia, Inc. Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

The Hyatt Grand Central New York is slated to be demolished over an 18-month period, followed by construction of 175 Park Avenue. Given the scale of the venture, it is likely that the project will not reach full completion until towards the end of the decade.

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