Massive NYC Dyke March takes over Fifth Avenue

Several thousand people took over Fifth Avenue for the 30th annual Dyke March.

Donna Aceto

Massive crowds roared along Fifth Avenue on June 25 as dykes from all walks of life marched from Bryant Park to Washington Square Park to commemorate New York’s 30th annual levee march.

The annual unauthorized march, which takes place just a day before the main New York City Pride festivities, tends to bring a lively, radical and refreshing grassroots atmosphere – no businesses or police allowed – and the march of this year was no different. Walkers denounced the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe v. Wade, emphasized bodily autonomy and highlighted the importance of standing up for trans rights at a time when trans and non-binary people are under siege across the country. The SCOTUS case, which was just decided a day before the march, weighed heavily on the march – and that was particularly evident in the sea of ​​signs blasting judges like Clarence Thomas, who used his concurring opinion to further threaten LGBTQ rights.

The march drew constant applause from the many on the sidelines who cheered and celebrated every step of the way. The dogs also joined in the fun – some dogs walked on their own, while others were carried in bags. Many volunteers have mobilized along the route to ensure the smooth running of the march. Some volunteers helped block traffic at intersections, while others rushed to bring wheelchairs to those in need.

The march eventually reached an already crowded Washington Square Park, where the Dyke March banner crossed the arch as the sun prepared to dip below the horizon.

Kat Burleson, who was attending the Dyke March for the very first time, held a sign saying “‘queer’ as in edgy”, with each letter a different color of the rainbow.

“It was amazing,” Burleson said after reaching Washington Square Park. “I grew up mostly in New York, but we moved up north when I was in high school and there was no gay community. Every Pride since I got back, I’ve felt so relaxed.

The Dyke March festivities continued in the park after the rest of the walkers arrived. As the night wore on, those who marched also spread out in the restaurants, bars and streets of the West Village on a warm and beautiful New York Pride weekend.

Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto

Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Matt Tracy
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Donna Aceto
Matt Tracy